LUNCH 10 Call for Submissions

When we cross frontiers, what do we meet? Modes of visual, verbal and data communication have brought forth feelings of both awareness and disunity. Across scales, aliens emerge from this discord.

The issue is not only of the alien or non­alien but of negotiated territory where the value of invasive species, hazardous materials and estranged forms comes into question. The enculturation of mobility, tourism, and surveillance is shifting self-perceptions and uprooting grounded relationships. What was once permanent can no longer be taken for granted.

As expanses shrink and technology enables, what aliens do we encounter and what are the rules of engagement? How do aliens operate within design? How are they agents of evocation, protocol, and myth? How are architects alien? What boundaries do we trespass?

ALIEN asks you to consider limits, permeations, the unfamiliar and the strange. Send us your declarations, pleas and confessions. We’re looking for tested stories, ponderings, theories, manifestos, proposals, mappings, interviews, graphics – a wide array of responses that will incite conversation and engage us in ways of seeing the alien in our world and beyond.

 

Abstracts are due November 14, 2014.

Full submissions are due January 9, 2015. Please limit articles to 3000 words.

Submit at lunchdesignjournal.submittable.com/submit and contact info@lunch.com with questions.

Copies of LUNCH 9 IN EXCESS are now available on Amazon.

Lunch is a design research journal edited and designed by students at the University of Virginia School of Architecture. Go to UVaLunch.com for past volumes and more information.

 

lunch9

Excess is one of the most significant ethical questions we confront as designers, as our practice is inextricably linked to material, economic, and social resources. In this context, excess can mean many things: it can mean plenty, but it can also mean too much; it can mean profit, but also waste, and the difference is largely a matter of perspective. So how do we decide what is enough? Is enough the same for everyone? How do we measure, much less decide, what is — in quantity or quality — excessive? And how then, as designers, do we operate in response?

There are, of course, many answers to these questions. In this edition of lunch, designers, planners, and historians offer their perspectives on how this question manifests itself in various aspects of our built environment. As you peruse the pages of lunch9, we hope you will join this conversation, and consider your own perspective. For while there may be no consensus here on whether excess is good or bad, in the end it is always an opportunity.

Editors: Sarah E. Brummett, Sarah Beth McKay, and Tammy Teng

Advising Editors: Dannielle Joan Alexander, Nicholas Knodt, and Clayton Willions

lunch9 Team: Amanda Coen, Alan Ford, Katie Gleysteen, Amanda Goodman, Katie Gronsky, Stephen Hobbs, Sam Manock, Marina Michael, Chad Miller, Arden Nguyen, Margaret Nersten, Bella Purdy, Margaret Rew, Yishou Wang, and Chris Young

Special thanks to: Kim Tanzer, Ghazal Abbasy-Asbagh, Iñaki Alday, Robin Dripps, Rebecca Cooper, Allen Lee, Nana Last, Matt Pinyan, and Paper Matters Press

featuring:

MONTAGE AND EXCESS
Ryan Flener, Levi Hooten, and Samuel Mortimer
The Planning Agency

THE GREAT QUESTION IS NOW AT ISSUE
Daniel Daou, Harvard University, D.Des

BLURRING BOUNDARIES
WASTE AS A VEHICLE FOR A SOCIAL METAMORPHOSIS
Reza Nik, Dalhousie University, M.Arch 2013

TRANSDUCTION
CONVERSATIONS WITH NATALIE JEREMIJENKO AND THE PARTNERS OF FUTURE CITIES LAB 

AT HOME IN THE FOULED UNIVERSE
ECOLOGIES OF EXCESS
Alyssa K. Olson, University of Pennsylvania, MLA, M.Arch 2014

COMPLEX TRANSPARENCY
LOOKING THROUGH EXCESS
Curtis Perrin, Ph.D, M.Arch

SALT SAND SIEVE
Katherine Jenkins, University of Virginia, MLA 2013
Parker Sutton, University of Virginia, M.Arch 2013

IS MODERNITY OUR ANTIQUITY?
Jorg D. Sieweke, University of Virginia, Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture

ABSENCE | ABUNDANCE
THE INFRASTRUCTURAL WILD
Gwendolyn McGinn, University of Virginia, MLA 2014
Rachel Vassar, University of Virginia, MLA 2014

CONSOLIDATED EXCESS
RESIDUAL SPATIAL ARTIFACTS
David Karle, University of Nebraska at Lincoln, Assistant Professor of Architecture

THE ROLE OF EXCESS IN LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE AS A FORM OF CURATION
Grey Elam, University of Virginia, MLA 2014

DIRTY ARCHITECTURE
ARCHITECTURE AND ITS RELEVANCE TO TIME
Darius Woo, Cornell University, B.Arch 2011

THE ARCHITECTURE OF PERFECTION
Gabrielle Piazza Patawaran, Harvard University, M.Arch 2013

THERE AND THERE AGAIN
A RULE: DERIVATIONS OF NATURE
William DiBernado, Harvard University, MLA 2013

PATTERNED AND ELABORATED
ORNAMENT
Ghazal Abbasy-Asbagh, University of Virginia, Lecturer in Architecture

THE CRITICAL MASS
FLOATING POPULATION & SELF-HELP HOUSING IN BEIJING
Ida D. K. Tam, Cornell University, M.Arch 2012

LOTS
EXCESS AS A WAY OF DISSOLUTION
Joana Polónia, University of Porto, M.Arch 2013

DEEP TIME, WIDE OPEN SPACES, AND NUCLEAR AMERICA
AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMIE KRUSE AND ELIZABETH ELLSWORTH OF SMUDGE STUDIO
Emily Gordon, Harvard University, MLA 2012
Sara Jacobs, Harvard University, MLA 2012

A FUTURE FOR PYRAMIDEN
GHOST TOWN OF THE INDUSTRIAL ARCTIC
Jennifer Livingston, University of Virginia, MLA 2015

COLUM(N)BA
A LIVING MONUMENT FOR THE DEAD
Natalie Kwee, Cornell University, B.Arch 2013
Caio Barboza, Cornell University, B.Arch 2013

THE FUTURE OF LAND USE IN VIRGINIA
A GIS MODEL
Luke Juday, University of Virginia, MUEP 2014

WASH
URBAN HYDROLOGICAL NETWORKS FOR RESILIENT CULTURAL ECOLOGIES
Aja Justine Bulla-Richards, University of Virginia, MLA 2013, M.Arch 2011

OUT OF SITE
Benjamin M. Gregory, University of Virginia, M.Arch 2014

THE LAND OF ABUNDANCE
SIX POINTS OF CONVERGENCE BETWEEN TERRITORY AND EXCESS IN SAN JOSÉ
Natalia S. Meza, University of Porto, Ph.D Arch

CITY OF BLUBBER
A FANTASY
Seth McDowell, Partner, mcdowellespinosa
University of Virginia, Assistant Professor of Architecture

Cover graphics by Omar Ali.

 

MODERNISM’S UNFINISHED LEGACY:

The (in)Excess(able) Experience of Alterstudio’s Six Houses

John Reynolds

Our times of change and transition do not permit big gestures. There are only a few remaining common values left upon which we can build and which we can all share. I thus appeal for an architecture of common sense based on the fundamentals that we still know, understand, and feel. Peter Zumthor, Thinking Architecture, 1999